Did you miss our special Failure Lab event? Or do you want to revisit our storyteller’s heartfelt vulnerability?

Listen below to Ryan, Alexandra, Michael, Kathleen, Missy, and Sal share their tales of failure with our sold-out audience.

Failure Lab was an outstanding example of exactly who the SCA is and what we offer:

inspirational education

bold entertainment
unexpected engagement

Something extraordinary was truly happening that night… a transformative experience for many.

A huge thank you to our talented performers: West Michigan Gay Chorus, Lane Ellens, Cameron Blake & Jill Warne, Yolonda Lavender, Cirque du K, Lexi Adams, West Michigan Folk Academy Students, Deavondre Jones, Code West and everyone who made the event possible — until next time!

RYAN KILPATRICK:
“I started putting ego over equity… I kept saying “I’m going to do it,” but I didn’t…I eventually wrote a plan. I drafted a plan, I would tweak the plan, but month after month after month went by — and I never said anything.”

ALEXANDRA MEISTER:
“I knew I couldn’t go on like that. It wasn’t healthy for our relationship, my mental health and certainly not for my physical state. So, when my yearly meeting with my director came up, I went into his office and thanked him – and told him I would be leaving at the end of the season.”

MICHAEL HYACINTHE:
” As a Seabee, we were trained to succeed in everything that we do; it’s what was instilled in us from boot camp to A school to many deployments. When you exit the Navy as a Seabee you are trained to succeed, and yet you get back into society and you fail. They trained me to succeed, but they never trained me to fail.”

KATHLEEN PIGGINS:
“The positivity that’s moved me through life, that’s kept me going … It’s not always there. All I see is my chair. All I see is my own inabilities and failings and weaknesses. While I long to be seen as strong… people often see the chair or nothing at all.”

MISSY COREY:
” Kitchens are like pressure cookers for emotions. If you really care about your food you’re constantly subjected to the scrutiny of others, and the pressure that comes with that scrutiny. I was so obsessed with trying to be perfect, trying to be the chef I thought I had to be that I let my adrenaline get the best of me.”

SAL SAPIENZA:
“I had to look at my ego, my pride, my biases, and my privilege. I had to admit to myself that I had a heck of a lot to learn about teaching.”

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